Tag Archives: Divine Cities

City of Blades by Robert Jackson Bennett

This book was freaking fantastic. Like, so good I almost didn’t want to start another book because I couldn’t recover. Wow.

City_of_Blades_cover

Hint: swords are important in this novel.

I love the concept behind the Divine Cities trilogy. The Divinities are dead, killed in the war between the Saypuris and Continentals almost a century ago. The Saypuris, once enslaved by the Continentals and their gods, are now large and in charge and trying to unite both their land and the Continent under the same ruler. Hasn’t been going as planned though, because these Divinities and their powers can’t quite seem to stay as dead as everyone hopes.

Alright. Here’s the synopsis for the second book in the trilogy, City of Blades:

The city of Voortyashtan was once the domain of the goddess of death, war, and destruction, but now it’s little more than a ruin. General Turyin Mulaghesh is called out of retirement and sent to this hellish place to try to find a Saypuri secret agent who’s gone missing in the middle of a mission, but the city of war offers countless threats: not only have the ghosts of her own past battles followed her here, but she soon finds herself wondering what happened to all the souls that were trapped in the afterlife when the Divinities vanished. Do the dead sleep soundly in the land of death? Or do they have plans of their own?

My one and only (small) gripe with this book was that I really could have used a “In the previous novel…” type-thing at the beginning. I read City of Stairs quite awhile ago, and it took me awhile to remember who all the characters are and their relationships, etc. But I figured it out quickly enough, and not remembering all the details from City of Stairs wasn’t a problem.

Turyin Mulaghesh was a fantastic character. She was not your average hero. Having been instrumental in winning the Battle of Bulikov, she has taken her prosthetic arm and retired. She in NOT pleased to be dragged out of retirement by Prime Minister Shara (hero of book one), who uses a glitch in the system to claim Mulaghesh must work a few more months to receive her military pension. Thus, Mulaghesh is sent on a mission to determine if the mysterious white powder being mined in Voortyashtan is Divine, and discover what happened to the spy-scientist Shara sent before who has mysteriously disappeared. The mission is fraught with peril, and not just the physical kind. In charge of the Fort in Voortyashtan is General Biswal, Mulaghesh’s former commander who brings with him a host of terrible memories from the last war that Mulaghesh wishes she could forget. Added to the mystery of the missing scientists are the horrific deaths of the natives happening around the city. Suddenly, the issues facing Mulaghesh are much bigger than just a missing person, and she must race to figure out what is going on in Voortyashtan before everyone’s lives are at stake.

Throughout both this novel and the previous one, author Bennett does a masterful job weaving his world’s history into the present-day plot. His world-building is spectacular. So much detail, so much history, and every bit of it adds to the story. While at times all this information can be over-whelming and difficult to keep straight, Bennett does a skillful job helping his readers determine what is important and remember how everything connects. It’s rather amazing how he brings everything together.

Bennett’s stories are a fabulous, fun mix of mystery and fantasy. Readers of either genre will enjoy his work. It will grab on to your imagination, and won’t let go. I can’t wait to get my hands on the third book in the trilogy, City of Miracles. This book receives a rare 5 out of 5 stars from me, and is recommended to those who enjoy other high fantasy novels, like those of Brandon Sanderson or Sarah J Maas. Read it. You will not be disappointed.