Tag Archives: Bone Universe

Cloudbound by Fran Wilde

Cloudbound is the second book in Fran Wilde’s Bone Universe trilogy. This review will contain MAJOR SPOILERS for Updraft, the first book in the series.

For real. Big spoilers. Turn back now if you don’t want to read them.

LAST CHANCE to avoid spoilers!!

cloudbound coverThe Spire has fallen. The Singers, except for Kirit, have had their wings stripped and are being treated as criminals. The City is trying to govern itself. Kirit’s wing-brother Naton has chosen to take a seat on this new Council to try and help make decisions that help the City. But despite Nat and the Council’s best efforts, the City is dying. Many of the Council members want to hold a Conclave – throwing the former Singers down into the clouds in hopes it will appease the City. Hoping to find an alternative, Nat begins searching lower tiers to see if the City’s history can provide an answer. What he finds instead could change everything.

Yes, that was a very dramatic ending to my summary. But it’s sorta true, and its the best I can do without giving away the ending. This book was quite a bit different than the first, mainly because it was told from Nat’s point-of-view instead of Kirit’s. When I saw Fran Wilde speak down in Philly a few months ago, she indicated that several of her fans were very angry with her for changing the narrator. Not me though! By the end of Updraft, I had enough of Kirit. She was indecisive and whiny, and only more so in this book. For me, Nat was a more relate-able character. He had a rough life, made some tough decisions, and wasn’t afraid to admit when he made a mistake, which for me was very impressive.

We also got to know some characters better in this book that we barely met in Updraft. This added diversity and interest to the story. We learned more about the world, too. The technology in this world is rather incredible. Everyone flies everywhere – like, not in a plane, with wings. The live in living, growing bone towers that reach above the clouds. There are terrifying creatures that live in the sky, though the worst live below the clouds. And no one seems to know all that much about the towers, or where they came from. But not knowing isn’t good enough for most of the citizens anymore, especially not Nat, Kirit and their friends. We learn about the City’s history along with them. We watch them uncover conspiracy and still keep the best interests of the citizens in mind, even when the citizens turn on them. There’s so much betrayal in this novel! And unexpected twists!

The third novel in the series, Horizon, releases in two or three weeks. I’m very excited to see what happens next for Kirit, Nat, and the rest of the City. Will their home continue to die? Will Kirit and Nat find out what happened to the City in the past? Will it matter? Will everyone survive? Plus, I’m willing to bet both Kirit and Nat will be narrating, which will be awesome. Can’t wait to get my hands on this book!

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Cloudbound receives 4 out of 5 stars from me. An excellent fantasy and adventure novel, with a beautifully built world that gets completely turned on its side. And still no distracting love story. Hooray!

 

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Updraft by Fran Wilde

UpdraftKirit lives in a city made of bone high above the clouds. Her mother Ezarit is an accomplished trader, who flies between bone towers negotiating trades and delivering anything any of the other people need, including medicine. All Kirit has to do is pass her wing test in a few days, and she can join her. But everything is turned sideways three nights before the wing test when Kirit it sitting on her balcony and is attacked by a skymouth. Kirit screams at the skymouth’s approach, and it flees from her voice. This unusual and rare event is witnessed by a Singer named Wik, a protector of the city. Wik offers Kirit a place as a Singer, and when she refuses, he sabotages her wing test and she fails. In retaliation, Kirit and her best friend Nat fly to the Spire, the home of the Singers, a place forbidden to regular citizens. Kirit is caught and told in order to keep the rest of her family and friends alive, she must become a Singer. Desperate to keep her mother and friends safe, Kirit agrees, moves into the Spire and begins training to become a Singer, the very thing she used to hate. The longer she lives among them, the more secrets Kirit discovers the Singers are hiding, and the more determined she becomes to reveal the truth to everyone.

Updraft is the first book in Fran Wilde’s Bone Universe trilogy. It falls somewhere between YA and adult fantasy. The protagonist Kirit is around 17 years old (though Wilde never says specifically), which often indicates YA fiction, but the novel’s themes of secrecy, betrayal, and death are much more “Adult” in nature. The library where I borrowed the book files it with their adult fiction. I snagged the book after I saw Fran Wilde speak in Philly with Kevin Hearne and Chuck Wendig. She was fabulous, and I was intrigued by the novel’s concept of a people who live above the clouds and build their own wings to travel around their city.

Wilde falls firmly into the Show Don’t Tell camp of world building. I never felt like I completely, 100% understood how the world worked, with the bone towers and Spire and how everything connected – and it was perfect. Not knowing everything added to the suspense and drama of the novel, and allowed the reader to better relate to Kirit, since Kirit didn’t know everything about her city either. Finding out along with Kirit really drew the reader into the story – you share her frustrations, fears, and hopes as they happen, and are never sure whether or not things are going to work out. I loved the feeling of not knowing, experiencing genuine fear and concern for characters I liked, hatred for those I disliked, and never quite knowing which side I was on.

Kirit was a well-written character. She was a heroine, but she didn’t have any special powers beyond grit and determination. She stood by her beliefs, but listened to new thoughts and ideas and wasn’t afraid to adjust her worldview when she learned new things. She protected those she loved, and always did what she believed was right. Her actions and choices made sense, and were believable – the reader could buy into the idea that Kirit was a relatively normal young adult and capable of thinking what she thought and doing what she did. Yes, that sentence is rather vague, but this book had too many twists and turns for me to even hint at a spoiler.

Speaking of the twists and turns, there were almost too many. Perhaps it was just because I was so engrossed in the novel, and so desperately needed to know how everything worked out, that I read it in about a day and a half. The slow reveal of all the various relationships between characters certainly added to the suspense, but I did catch myself thinking at one point, “Oh Good Lord, not another betrayal!” It got a little over-whelming to keep track of everything, and who was on which side of the conflict. This was not overly detrimental to the novel though, and I probably wouldn’t have noticed as much if I hadn’t been fatiguing from reading for about 5 hours straight.

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Me, this morning. 

Finally, I must mention, there was no hint of a love triangle. No love story at all really. See, authors everywhere. You can write a successful, thought-provoking, honestly fantastic YA(ish) fantasy novel without a lovesick, tortured female protagonist. There’s a tiny, minuscule, barely worth mentioning possibility one could appear in a later novel. But I find that rather unlikely. There was no cliffhanger either! Are there unanswered questions? Sure. Of course I want to know what happens next – I’m completely invested in Kirit, her friends Nat and Wik, especially since by the end of the novel the City has changed quite a bit since the beginning. But the main plot lines wrapped up fairly neatly, and the ending was satisfying.

4 and a half stars

Fran Wilde’s Updraft receives  4.5 out of 5 stars from me and I highly recommend it to those who love high fantasy, an unusual world, and a realistic, believable heroine. The second book in the trilogy is called Cloudbound, and I’m looking forward to reading it as soon as possible so I can be ready for the release of Horizon, the final book in the trilogy, this September. Go out and enjoy it!